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Hearing Loss Explained - Giulio Bonasera
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Hearing Loss Explained

GQ Magazine

How do you hear?
A problem for our modern world and probably the most common way that younger men and women get this permanent form of sensorineural hearing loss when exposed to one off or repeated exposure to loud sounds. This could be from military service, construction, loud music concerts – even just having your headphones too loud. In this form of damage, the nerve cells in the inner ear are simply over stimulated and subsequently lose the ability to hear higher pitched sounds. It’s not reversible.