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Collaborative Overload - Giulio Bonasera
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Collaborative Overload

HBR's OnPoint Magazine

Too much teamwork exhausts employees and saps productivity.
''Collaboration is indeed the answer to many of today’s most pressing business challenges. But more isn’t always better. Leaders must learn to recognize, promote, and efficiently distribute the right kinds of collaborative work, or their teams and top talent will bear the costs of too much demand for too little supply. In fact, we believe that the time may have come for organizations to hire chief collaboration officers. By creating a senior executive position dedicated to collaboration, leaders can send a clear signal about the importance of managing teamwork thoughtfully and provide the resources necessary to do it effectively. That might reduce the odds that the whole becomes far less than the sum of its parts.'' - Rob Cross, Reb Rebele, and Adam Grant